1752 and all that; derivation of the modern calendar – 8pm Wed 15th April 2020

‘Give us our eleven days!’    Did he English calendar riots of 1752 actually happen?

Come along  to a fascinating talk by Mark Bowman at 8.00 pm, 15th April 20 in St Paul’s Church Hall, Tadley RG26 3PB

In England and Wales, the legal year 1751 was a short year of 282 days, running from 25 March to 31 December. 1752 began on 1 January. To align the calendar in use in England to that on the continent, the Gregorian calendar was adopted, and the calendar was advanced by 11 days: Wednesday 2 September 1752 was followed by Thursday 14 September 1752. The year 1752 was a leap year so that it consisted of 355 days (366 days less 11 omitted).

As well as adopting the Gregorian rule for leap years, Pope Gregory’s rules for the date of Easter were also adopted. However, with religious strife still on their minds, the British could not bring themselves to adopt the Catholic system explicitly: the Annexe to the Act established a computation for the date of Easter that achieved the same result as Gregory’s rules, without actually referring to him!

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